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JUNGLEYE

Starting in 2015, Jungleye is an association of participatory photography project whose goal is to collect a visual and transitive memory of the exile journey in order to give a voice to migrants and refugees. The images and stories gathered in this project are produced by the displaced communities themselves. Aspiring to a more united and peaceful society, this project is based on two aspects:

1 – Access to culture and the enhancement of talents and skills of each in order to promote personal reconstruction in posttraumatic situations. 

2 – Raising awareness among the civil society about the migratory issue and living conditions of displaced communities in order to promote social stability.

JUNGLEYE

Starting in 2015, Jungleye is an association of participatory photography project whose goal is to collect a visual and transitive memory of the exile journey in order to give a voice to migrants and refugees. The images and stories gathered in this project are produced by the displaced communities themselves. Aspiring to a more united and peaceful society, this project is based on two aspects:

1 – Access to culture and the enhancement of talents and skills of each in order to promote personal reconstruction in posttraumatic situations. 

2 – Raising awareness among the civil society about the migratory issue and living conditions of displaced communities in order to promote social stability.

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1 – ACCESS TO CULTURE

Since 2015, Jungleye has been running photography workshops in Europe and the Middle East among migrant and refugee communities in partnership with various local and international NGOs. This project is part of a program of self-reconstruction through the use of artistic and cultural activities as an educational and therapeutic tool. Indeed, art is an international language; these workshops create a safe and participative space for learning and experiencing photography, communication and self-expression methods. Using art as a healing tool offers refugees and migrants a way to deal with and relieve stress, overcome fears and talk about past experiences. Artistic expression becomes a new way for them to reflect on their journey and to address complex questions. While the basic rights of migrants and refugees have often been ignored or disregarded during their journey, and because insecurity and uncertainty are a permanent concern, the workshops are a place of free expression. The production of visuals is an opportunity for participants to gain access to a daily structure, professional skills and an artistic experience. This process helps them reconnect with their dignity and self-determination – all through the lens of a camera. Heard and appreciated, they find a form of confidence and self-esteem, necessary to overcome trauma, and to try to change the public opinion.

2 – AWARENESS TOOL

In a second step, these workshops will amplify the voices of millions of migrants and refugees facing the challenges of exile while fighting for their most basic human rights. Narrative production is given to displaced communities to testify about their own stories of exile. This creative photography laboratory plays an important role in questioning and confronting migratory movements, while offering an alternative to the contemporary problems of migration. Throughout this so-called «migration crisis», photography and images in the media have been a powerful tool for shaping public perceptions of events. These images, in turn, influence public opinion, political discourse and institutional solutions (or lack thereof). This project aims to facilitate the production and visibility of images that respect the human character, dignity, resilience, and ingenuity of those in transit. Through the dissemination of the testimonies produced during each workshop, this alternative photographic documentation aims to become a catalyst for change, giving a mutual understanding of the largest population movement since the Second World War. The organization of exhibitions, the dissemination of postcards produced by the participants of each workshop and the setting up of participatory activities in public spaces make it possible to give an identity, a name and an image to the refugees who are most often perceived as an impersonal mass and not as individuals. Images become more than just a message: the physical and emotional journey is transformed into a larger narrative, becoming a story we all share.

Postcards

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